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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

A Clinical trial is a process which is performed to determine whether an investigational drug, device or therapy is safe and effective.   In early phase research (i.e. Phases 1 and 2), the safety and effectiveness of the drug will be evaluated in healthy volunteers.

Clinical Trials are divided into 4 phases.  Phase 1 and 2 trials constitute early phase trials, Phase 3 and 4 research studies are late-phase trials.

The primary objective of Phase 1 studies is to determine the correct drug dosage by evaluating drug safety and determining if there are any side effects.  Phase 1 trials are conducted in healthy volunteers.

Phase 2 studies also study the safety of a drug but focus on evaluating its effectiveness. These studies can be conducted in healthy volunteers or in individuals who have a certain disease or condition.

As every study is testing an investigational product, there may be side effects.  You will be provided with a list of side effects that have been reported in previous trials (if any), so you can make an informed decision whether or not to participate in the trial.  During the trial you will be required to immediately inform clinic study staff of any adverse effects that you are experiencing. These side effects usually resolve upon discontinuation of the study drug.

In order to evaluate the drug profile, we need to understand its pharmacokinetics. This is essentially how the body reacts to a drug after its administration through the mechanisms of absorption, distribution, as well as the metabolic changes.  Therefore, blood draws are collected at various time points to better understand this mechanism.  Each study requires a specific number of blood draws and total blood volume.  These values will be provided to you and clearly stipulated in the informed consent form (ICF). The amount of blood that will be taken is outlined in the ICF.

Volunteers are compensated and the amount varies depending on the length of the clinical trial, length of stay and number of follow-up visits.  The compensation is not specifically related to the risks or type of drug involved in the trials or studies.  Every study is different and therefore, the compensation will vary.   Study volunteers may receive between $1000 to $4000 for a trial (based on the factors listed above).

Food – Clinical trials are conducted in a controlled setting which means that all food is provided and  trial volunteers receive standardised meals.  Individual meal plans or meal preferences cannot be provided.  If you have any food allergies or hypersensitivity to food product(s) that are clinically significant or life-threatening you may not be able to participate in a trial.    Please contact us to discuss any food issues.

Accommodation – During your in-clinic stay you will share sleeping areas with other volunteers who are of the same gender.  Similar to a hospital setting, supervision will be provided to ensure that your health and safety are being monitored.

Every trial is distinctly structured.  The number and duration of the in-clinic stays, return visits and overall sessions varies.    Before you enroll in a trial you will be provided with a study schedule.  If you are unable to commit to the schedule and all the stipulated visits you will not be able to participate in the trial.   Once the study commences and if you are unable to come in for a scheduled visit you will be compensated on a pro-rated basis (i.e. for the time that you have participated in the trial).  Deductions will be incurred for missed visits, lateness or non-compliances.  These will be clearly stipulated in the informed consent form (ICF).

Before you decide whether or not to take part in a clinical research study, you will be required to read and understand the information provided in an Informed Consent Form (ICF).  The ICF describes the clinical research study and the nature of the investigational product to be used, including:

  • Your rights and responsibilities as a study participant.
  • What you will be asked to do during study participation.
  • The potential risks that you should be aware of.

During this process, you will have the opportunity to discuss and ask questions related to the conduct of the clinical research study with the study doctor/ study staff.  You are under no obligation to participate and your decision to take part in a clinical trial is voluntary.

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